Systemd Vulnerable to DNS Attacks

Systemd, the Linux world’s favorite init monolith, can be potentially crashed or hijacked by malicious DNS servers. Patches are available to address the security flaw, and should be installed ASAP if you’re affected.
Continue reading Systemd Vulnerable to DNS Attacks

Advertisements

Linux Kernel Zero Day Vulnerability CVE-2016-0728

This vulnerability has existed since 2012 and it affects Android and Linux systems running Linux Kernel version 3.8+, and Linux server or desktop running kernel 3.8+ is vulnerable.

As of the date of disclosure, this vulnerability has implications for approximately tens of millions of Linux PCs and servers, and 66 percent of all Android devices (phones/tablets).

How do I fix this?

First some background on what the CVE-2016-0728 bug is. From the Perception Point Research Team

CVE-2016-0728 is caused by a reference leak in the keyrings facility. Before we dive into the details, let’s cover some background required to understand the bug. It can successfully escalates privileges from a local user to root.

Continue reading Linux Kernel Zero Day Vulnerability CVE-2016-0728

Shellshock: Better ‘bash’ patches now available

The first patches for Shellshock didn’t offer complete protection. The latest revisions of this patch for the popular Mac OS X, Linux, and Unix bash shell security problem were released on Friday, offering greater defenses against hackers.

The problem with the first patch, as Red Hat explained in its Shellshock FAQ, was that it only took care of the original bash flaw CVE-2014-6271. This, the true Shellshock bug, is the worst bash security hole. There were also others.

Red Hat said: “Shortly after that issue went public a researcher found a similar flaw that wasn’t blocked by the first fix and this was assigned CVE-2014-7169.” This bug is also a security problem, but it’s not as bad as the other flaw.

Later, Red Hat Product Security researcher Florian Weimer found additional problems and these were designated CVE-2014-7186 and CVE-2014-7187. Fortunately, these bugs are less serious and the latest patch takes care of these as well. As Red Hat’s Huzaifa Sidhpurwala told me: “The latest version of bash fixes all the CVE issues.”

So, what you want to do now, if you haven’t already, is check to see if you’re running a vulnerable version of bash. Continue reading Shellshock: Better ‘bash’ patches now available

Configuring Software RAID in CentOS or RHEL

First off let’s get a bit into what RAID is for those that are not familiar.

What is RAID

Redundant Array of Independent Disks; originally Redundant Array of Inexpensive Disks (RAID) is basically a way of storing the same data across multiple disks thereby offering redundancy. Gains are made in I/O (Inout/Output) and RAIDing reduces mean time between failures (MTBF), it increases fault tolerance as well.

To the OS, a RAID array appears a a single logical drive or a series of drives depending on your choice of striping. Striping involves partitioning each drive’s storage space into units ranging from one sector (512 bytes) to several MB or GB. In a multi-user system, better performance requires establishing a stripe wide enough to hold the typical or maximum size record. This allows overlapped disk I/O across drives. Continue reading Configuring Software RAID in CentOS or RHEL