Linux Lite on older CPUs with PAE

On machines with older Pentium M ™ and Celeron M ™ processors, there is an extra requirement to get Linux installed, I’ve encountered this mainly with Linux Lite as that is the OS of choice I use for older systems.

Important: This only works if your installation is failing with this error kernel requires features not present on the CPU: PAE

Continue reading Linux Lite on older CPUs with PAE

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Systemd Vulnerable to DNS Attacks

Systemd, the Linux world’s favorite init monolith, can be potentially crashed or hijacked by malicious DNS servers. Patches are available to address the security flaw, and should be installed ASAP if you’re affected.
Continue reading Systemd Vulnerable to DNS Attacks

macOS 10.13 High Sierra Public Beta

macOS Public Beta is now active, however; there are many articles out there telling users how to signup then leaving them short of getting the actual update.

I have been checking for days now and the update would not show up.. So I dug around and found the installer.
Continue reading macOS 10.13 High Sierra Public Beta

grub-pc (2.02~beta2-36ubuntu3.10)

I’m running an Ubuntu server and the other day while running updates I started getting the following error:

Setting up grub-pc (2.02~beta2-36ubuntu3.10) ...
/var/lib/dpkg/info/grub-pc.postinst: line 703: syntax error near unexpected token `fi'
dpkg: error processing package grub-pc (--configure):
 subprocess installed post-installation script returned error exit status 2
Errors were encountered while processing:
 grub-pc
E: Sub-process /usr/bin/dpkg returned an error code (1)

Opening /var/lib/dpkg/info/grub-pc.postinst I found:

        if dpkg --compare-versions "$2" lt-nl 2.02~beta2-36ubuntu3.10 then
          if [ -e "/boot/efi/EFI/${bootloader_id}/fbx64.efi" ]; then
            rm -f "/boot/efi/EFI/${bootloader_id}/fbx64.efi";
          fi
        fi

There was a missing semicolon in the first line and that’s what was breaking my update. I updated it and the error went away:

        if dpkg --compare-versions "$2" lt-nl 2.02~beta2-36ubuntu3.10; then
          if [ -e "/boot/efi/EFI/${bootloader_id}/fbx64.efi" ]; then
            rm -f "/boot/efi/EFI/${bootloader_id}/fbx64.efi";
          fi
        fi

What to do after installing Ubuntu 16.04 Xenial Xerus

I never use anything but LTS if and when I put Ubuntu on my machines so I will not cover 15.10 or 16.10. These are some of the things to do right after installing Ubuntu on your computer.

Important:
This is not an exhaustive list nor is it the only things to do. If you have anything to add, please leave a comment below.

Most of these steps will be terminal based so start up a terminal. Press the super key (the Key Formerly Known as the Windows Key) to bring up the Unity dash. Then, type in terminal and choose the icon for the terminal program.

Continue reading What to do after installing Ubuntu 16.04 Xenial Xerus

Linux Kernel Zero Day Vulnerability CVE-2016-0728

This vulnerability has existed since 2012 and it affects Android and Linux systems running Linux Kernel version 3.8+, and Linux server or desktop running kernel 3.8+ is vulnerable.

As of the date of disclosure, this vulnerability has implications for approximately tens of millions of Linux PCs and servers, and 66 percent of all Android devices (phones/tablets).

How do I fix this?

First some background on what the CVE-2016-0728 bug is. From the Perception Point Research Team

CVE-2016-0728 is caused by a reference leak in the keyrings facility. Before we dive into the details, let’s cover some background required to understand the bug. It can successfully escalates privileges from a local user to root.

Continue reading Linux Kernel Zero Day Vulnerability CVE-2016-0728

Ubuntu and Debian End-of-Life Timeline

Ubuntu

Standard Ubuntu releases are supported for 9 months and Ubuntu LTS (Long Term Support) releases are supported for five years on both the desktop and the server. During that time, there will be security fixes and other critical updates.
Continue reading Ubuntu and Debian End-of-Life Timeline