grub-pc (2.02~beta2-36ubuntu3.10)

I’m running an Ubuntu server and the other day while running updates I started getting the following error:

Setting up grub-pc (2.02~beta2-36ubuntu3.10) ...
/var/lib/dpkg/info/grub-pc.postinst: line 703: syntax error near unexpected token `fi'
dpkg: error processing package grub-pc (--configure):
 subprocess installed post-installation script returned error exit status 2
Errors were encountered while processing:
 grub-pc
E: Sub-process /usr/bin/dpkg returned an error code (1)

Opening /var/lib/dpkg/info/grub-pc.postinst I found:

        if dpkg --compare-versions "$2" lt-nl 2.02~beta2-36ubuntu3.10 then
          if [ -e "/boot/efi/EFI/${bootloader_id}/fbx64.efi" ]; then
            rm -f "/boot/efi/EFI/${bootloader_id}/fbx64.efi";
          fi
        fi

There was a missing semicolon in the first line and that’s what was breaking my update. I updated it and the error went away:

        if dpkg --compare-versions "$2" lt-nl 2.02~beta2-36ubuntu3.10; then
          if [ -e "/boot/efi/EFI/${bootloader_id}/fbx64.efi" ]; then
            rm -f "/boot/efi/EFI/${bootloader_id}/fbx64.efi";
          fi
        fi

ttf-mscorefonts-installer fails to install/upgrade

In the article on What to do after installing Ubuntu 16.04 we went over installing some things to the default Ubuntu install and it seems one of the processes needs the ttf-mscorefonts-installer package. Well, it seems that something is broken in that process and this article will cover how to fix it and get your system back to full throttle…

What’s the error?

Here is what I’ve seen, sometimes it happens with different fonts as well.

ttf-mscorefonts-installer: downloading http://downloads.sourceforge.net/corefonts/andale32.exe
 Get:1 http://downloads.sourceforge.net/corefonts/andale32.exe [198 kB]
 Fetched 198 kB in 12s (15.8 kB/s)
 ttf-mscorefonts-installer: downloading http://downloads.sourceforge.net/corefonts/arial32.exe
 Get:1 http://downloads.sourceforge.net/corefonts/arial32.exe
 Fetched 552 B in 11s (47 B/s)

E: Failed to fetch http://downloads.sourceforge.net/corefonts/arial32.exe Hash Sum mismatch

E: Download Failed
 Setting up ttf-mscorefonts-installer (3.4+nmu1ubuntu2) ...

Continue reading ttf-mscorefonts-installer fails to install/upgrade

What to do after installing Ubuntu 16.04 Xenial Xerus

I never use anything but LTS if and when I put Ubuntu on my machines so I will not cover 15.10 or 16.10. These are some of the things to do right after installing Ubuntu on your computer.

Important:
This is not an exhaustive list nor is it the only things to do. If you have anything to add, please leave a comment below.

Most of these steps will be terminal based so start up a terminal. Press the super key (the Key Formerly Known as the Windows Key) to bring up the Unity dash. Then, type in terminal and choose the icon for the terminal program.

Continue reading What to do after installing Ubuntu 16.04 Xenial Xerus

Linux Kernel Zero Day Vulnerability CVE-2016-0728

This vulnerability has existed since 2012 and it affects Android and Linux systems running Linux Kernel version 3.8+, and Linux server or desktop running kernel 3.8+ is vulnerable.

As of the date of disclosure, this vulnerability has implications for approximately tens of millions of Linux PCs and servers, and 66 percent of all Android devices (phones/tablets).

How do I fix this?

First some background on what the CVE-2016-0728 bug is. From the Perception Point Research Team

CVE-2016-0728 is caused by a reference leak in the keyrings facility. Before we dive into the details, let’s cover some background required to understand the bug. It can successfully escalates privileges from a local user to root.

Continue reading Linux Kernel Zero Day Vulnerability CVE-2016-0728

Ubuntu and Debian End-of-Life Timeline

Ubuntu

Standard Ubuntu releases are supported for 9 months and Ubuntu LTS (Long Term Support) releases are supported for five years on both the desktop and the server. During that time, there will be security fixes and other critical updates.
Continue reading Ubuntu and Debian End-of-Life Timeline

Windows 10 power and display issue

I’ve been hearing people are having issues with their computers randomly powering on after a shutdown was issued and displays being dimmed and not being able to get the brightness back. Here are ways to fix those.

Continue reading Windows 10 power and display issue

Microsoft’s supposed forcing upgrading to Windows 10

Was stumbling on the webs earlier and came across an article saying that Microsoft is forcing people to upgrade to Windows 10. I am not a huge MS fan but I had to see for myself and it’s garbage.  I installed Windows7 on my laptop and got the familiar icon to upgrade but when I clicked on it I did not get the forced upgrade but instead got this:

Windows10 Upgrade Options
Windows 10 Upgrade Options

Notice it doesn’t say what others like InfoWorld are saying, which would insinuate a forced upgrade, according to the article in the link, the screen I have above has the following two options only:

Upgrade now or Upgrade tonight

Not sure exactly what these publishers are gunning for but it’s a bad game to play if they are not verifying this and only blindly repeating what others are saying.

Now, I’m not saying people are not getting that window. I’m saying that I did not get it and that publishers need to verify for themselves instead of just blindly regurgitating what they heard.

iOS 9 is out in the wild

Apple released iOS 9 into the wild and it looks awesome. I don’t run an iDevice so I can’t comment on it as far as performance and overall satisfaction but I will be checking in with friends that do to get their feedback.

If you use an iDevice and want to know if you can install iOS 9, here is the list of compatible devices:

iPhone iPad iPod
  • iPhone 6s
  • iPhone 6s Plus
  • iPhone 6
  • iPhone 6 Plus
  • iPhone 5s
  • iPhone 5c
  • iPhone 5
  • iPhone 4s
  • iPad Pro
  • iPad Air 2
  • iPad Air
  • iPad 4th generation
  • iPad 3rd generation
  • iPad 2
  • iPad mini 4
  • iPad mini 3
  • iPad mini 2
  • iPad mini
  • iPod touch 6th generation
  • iPod touch 5th generation

Noteworthy features

Notes

  • The Notes app has always been great for jotting down your thoughts. And now it’s great for so much more.
  • Turn lists into checklists – Add bullets with a tap to create checklists. Make a grocery list, a wish list, or a to-do list — and check off items as you go.
  • Sketch your thoughts – Use the tip of your finger to draw right in your note. A selection of drawing tools lets you choose different brush styles and colors. And a handy ruler helps you keep things straight.
  • Note it with a photo – Now you can take a photo from within the Notes app. Or tap to access your photo library and add an existing photo or video to a note.
  • All your notes across all your devices – Notes works with iCloud so you can access your notes no matter which device you’re using.

Maps

  • Transit – Maps now features Transit view, bringing you public transit information with routes and directions.
  • Nearby – When you search in Maps, you’ll see a list of categories including Food, Drinks, Shopping, Fun, and more.

Multitasking

  • Slide Over – Now you can open a second app without leaving the one you’re in.
  • Split View – With Split View, you can go a step further and have two apps open and active at the same time.
  • Picture in Picture – While using FaceTime or watching a video, press the Home button and your video screen scales down to a corner of your display.

Even longer battery life.

Across the entire operating system, apps and key technologies have been made more efficient to trim battery usage wherever possible — so you get more battery life for the things you do every day.

Smaller, more convenient updates.

iOS 9 does even more to efficiently stream new updates to your device without having to first download and unpack them — which means you don’t need as much free space to update.

  • iOS 9 – 1.3GB
  • iOS 8 – 4.58GB

Faster and more responsive.

The apps in iOS 9 now take advantage of Metal, making more efficient use of the CPU and GPU to deliver faster scrolling, smoother animation, and better overall performance.

Improved security.

Keeping your devices and Apple ID secure is essential to protecting your personal information — like photos, documents, messages, email, and so much more.

Six-digit passcodes

The default for passcodes on your Touch ID–enabled iPhone and iPad is now six digits instead of four.

Two-factor authentication

A password alone is not always enough to keep your account secure. That’s why iOS 9 and OS X El Capitan have built-in support for two-factor authentication.

Mac like mouse scrolling in Windows

If you’ve ever used a Mac computer you quickly start getting a feel for the natural scrolling system that makes it more natural, scroll up to move the page up and scroll down to move the page down just as you would if you were moving piece of paper on your desk.

Back when the mouse was king, scrolling down to move the page up made sense because the scroll-bar would move down; basically it mimicked the movement of the marker in the bar. With the advent of touch screens and two finger scrolling on Macs, it made perfect sense to move toward natural scrolling; but many complain that on a computer it doesn’t make sense nor does it feel natural. I personally beg to differ, it feels quite natural to me; I think of the scroll pad as a flat version of the screen, like with the dual screens on a Nintendo DS or having a small tablet surface. Now that I have been using natural scrolling for a while I can see how the old way is actually counter-intuitive and needs to change.

I’ve gotten so used to it at work that I had to change my mouse wheel scroll settings in Windows to be the same and now I’m sharing it with you so you can start to be more natural with your scrolling.

Open Notepad, Notepad++, or any other text editor. No, Microsoft Word will not work.

Type in the following lines for Windows 7:

Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Enum\HID\VID_045E&PID_00F9&MI_01&Col02\7&319870ac&0&0001\Device Parameters]
"FlipFlopWheel"=dword:00000001

Type in the following lines for Windows 10:

Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Enum\HID\VID_045E&PID_00F9&MI_01&Col02\7&319870ac&0&0001\Device Parameters]
"FlipFlopWheel"=dword:00000001
"ForceAbsolute"=dword:00000000
"Migrated"=dword:00000001
"HScrollPageOverride"=dword:00000000
"HScrollUsageOverride"=dword:00000000
"HScrollHighResolutionDisable"=dword:00000000
"VScrollPageOverride"=dword:00000000
"VScrollUsageOverride"=dword:00000000
"VScrollHighResolutionDisable"=dword:00000000
"FlipFlopHScroll"=dword:00000000
  • Click File → Save As
  • Choose Desktop as the location to save and name the file InvertMouse.reg

Go to your desktop and double-click the InvertMouse.reg file to make the entry into the registry then restart your computer.

Now if mice makers would start to use the Magic Mouse technology or Apple would allow their mice to be used on other OS systems.

Windows 10 Editions

Microsoft says that they designed Windows 10 to deliver a more personal computing experience across a range of devices.

An experience optimized for each device type, but familiar to all. Windows 10 will power an incredibly broad range of devices – everything from PCs, tablets, phones, Xbox One, Microsoft HoloLens and Surface Hub. It will also power the world around us, core to devices making up the Internet of Things, everything from elevators to ATMs to heart rate monitors to wearables. No matter which Windows 10 device our customers use, the experience will feel comfortable, and there will be a single, universal Windows Store where they can find, try and buy Universal Windows apps.

Past versions of Windows were tailored for different devices; with Windows 10, Microsoft is changing that by creating an edition system that address the needs of their diverse customer base from home users to IT to systems like ATMs. Same code base, same experience just on different devices. Continue reading Windows 10 Editions