Linux Malware Mines for Cryptocurrency Using Raspberry Pi Devices

A Linux trojan detected under the generic name of Linux.MulDrop.14 is infecting Raspberry Pi devices with the purpose of mining cryptocurrency.

According to Russian antivirus maker Dr.Web, the malware was first spotted online in the second half of May in the form of a script that contains a compressed and encrypted application.

Experts say the initial infection takes place when Raspberry Pi operators leave their devices’ SSH ports open to external connections.

Once a Raspberry Pi device is infected, the malware changes the password for the “pi” account to:

\$6\$U1Nu9qCp\$FhPuo8s5PsQlH6lwUdTwFcAUPNzmr0pWCdNJj.p6l4Mzi8S867YLmc7BspmEH95POvxPQ3PzP029yT1L3yi6K1

Read the full article here

New Attack Method Delivers Malware Via Mouse Hover

Mouseover’ technique relies on users hovering over hyperlinked text and images in Microsoft PowerPoint files to drop Trojan.

Researchers have found a new form of attack that abuses the action of hovering over hyperlinked text and images in a Microsoft PowerPoint presentation.

Trend Micro researchers discovered the “mouseover” technique, used by a Trojan downloader also found in a spam campaign hitting EMEA businesses in the manufacturing, education, pyrotechnics, logistics, and device fabrication industries. The downloader they analyzed delivers a version of the OTLARD banking Trojan, also known as GootKit.

“This is the first occurrence of malware using the ‘hover’ method to initiate a download that we know of,” says Mark Nunnikhoven, Trend Micro’s VP of cloud security.

“While GootKit is known malware, businesses should be more concerned about this latest technique as it shows none of the usual indicators of an infected document,” he explains. This is novel because it abuses the previously safe user practice of hovering over a link before clicking.
Continue reading New Attack Method Delivers Malware Via Mouse Hover

Google say Chrome OS can’t be hacked bets $2.7 million

Security is a core tenet of Chromium, which is why we hold regular competitions to learn from security researchers. Contests like Pwnium help us make Chromium even more secure. This year Pwnium 4 will once again set sights on Chrome OS, and will be hosted in March at the CanSecWest security conference in Vancouver.

With a total of $2.71828 million USD in the pot (mathematical constant e for the geeks at heart), we’ll issue Pwnium rewards for eligible Chrome OS exploits at the following levels:

  • $110,000 USD: browser or system-level compromise in guest mode or as a logged-in user, delivered via a web page.
  • $150,000 USD: compromise with device persistence: guest to guest with interim reboot, delivered via a web page.

New this year, we will also consider significant bonuses for demonstrating a particularly impressive or surprising exploit. Potential examples include defeating kASLR, exploiting memory corruption in the 64-bit browser process or exploiting the kernel directly from a renderer process.

Past Pwnium competitions have focused on Intel-based Chrome OS devices, but this year researchers can choose between an ARM-based Chromebook, the HP Chromebook 11 (WiFi), or the Acer C720 Chromebook (2GB WiFi) that is based on the Intel Haswell microarchitecture. The attack must be demonstrated against one of these devices running the then-current stable version of Chrome OS.

Any software included with the default installation may be used as part of the attack. For those without access to a physical device, the Chromium OS developer’s guide offers assistance on getting up and running inside a virtual machine, but note that a virtual environment might differ from the physical devices where the attack must be demonstrated.

To make sure everyone has enough time to demonstrate their exploit, we will require participants to register in advance for a timeslot. To register, e-mail pwnium4@chromium.org. Registration will close at 5:00 p.m. PST Monday, March 10th, 2014. Only exploits demonstrated on time in this specifically-arranged window will be eligible for a reward.

The official rules contain more details, but standard Pwnium rules apply: the deliverable is the full exploit, with explanations for all individual bugs used (which must be unknown); and exploits should be served from a password-authenticated and HTTPS-supported Google App Engine URL.

Original Post