Net Interface not loaded in Debian

I had to build out a Debian server for a project I was working on at home and my internet went down just as I started the build, deciding not to wait until it came back up; I went ahead with the build and finish the configs, upgrades and whatever else would be needed once the interwebs started working again.

The major issue I had was that networking was not able to be configured due to no connection found, that in turn left my software config to use the install media alone. Continue reading Net Interface not loaded in Debian

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Netgear Router Security Update

Netgear noted that several of their routers have a command injection Vulnerability issue where an attacker can use a phishing method to gain control of your router.

Tip:
To find the model/version number, check the bottom or back panel of your NETGEAR device.

From the vulnerability Notes Database:

R6200, R6250, R6400, R6700, R6900, R7000, R7100LG, R7300, R7900, R8000, D6220, and D6400 contain an unauthenticated command injection vulnerability that may be executed directly or via cross-domain requests. Known affected firmware versions include Netgear R7000 version 1.0.7.2_1.1.93, R6400 version 1.0.1.12_1.0.11, and R8000 version 1.0.3.4_1.1.2. Earlier versions may also be affected. The command injection vulnerability has been assigned CVE-2016-6277.

By convincing a user to visit a specially crafted web site, a remote, unauthenticated attacker may execute arbitrary commands with root privileges on affected routers. An unauthenticated, LAN-based attacker may do the same by issuing a direct request, e.g. by visiting: http:///cgi-bin/;COMMAND

Continue reading Netgear Router Security Update

Bringing down the Net?

Security expert Bruce Schneier recently talked about how someone is learning how to take down the internet. We have seen lots of companies talk about attacks on their infrastructure, breaches, hacking and stealing accounts, etc. As per the companies, it seems name of the attacks are made out to seem like probing for ways to get into networks and do harm.

It reminds me of the US’s Cold War program of flying high-altitude planes over the Soviet Union to force their air-defense systems to turn on, to map their capabilities.
– Bruce Schneier

Continue reading Bringing down the Net?

Configure WiFi on an Ubuntu Server

Ok, I know you’re wondering why I would ever want to setup WiFi on a server. Well, this was a small server to do some light work and I had a mini pc that had a builtin WiFi card that I used and since it had the option I figured I’d use the convenience rather than having to run another cable.

Continue reading Configure WiFi on an Ubuntu Server

Using Google Public DNS

Most people connect to the internet via their ISP’s DNS servers which more than likely are not the best and more than likely is slowing down your browsing. Using a 3rd party service not only speeds up your experience online. A while ago we wrote about OpenDNS, today we’re going over Google’s DNS service.

Important:
Make sure to write down your ISP’s DNS servers.

Google Public DNS IP addresses

IPv4 addresses are as follows:

  • 8.8.8.8
  • 8.8.4.4

IPv6 addresses are as follows:

  • 2001:4860:4860::8888
  • 2001:4860:4860::8844

Making the changes

Windows

  • Start the Network and Sharing Center (this process varies by windows version)
  • Click Change adadpter settings
  • Right-click Local Area Connection or Wireless Network Connection slelect Properties
  • Type in your administrator password if you are promted for it.
  • Click the Networking tab
  • Under the Internet Protocol Version 4 (TCP/IPv4) or Internet Protocol Version 6 (TCP/IPv6) and click Properties
  • Click Advanced and select the DNS tab, write down any IP’s that are listed here for future reference in case you want to revert later on.
  • Select Use the following DNS server addresses
  • Enter the IP’s from above
  • Restart your computer

Mac OS

  • Click the Apple menu ()
  • Click System Preferences and click the Network logo.
  • Select the connection you want to configure (Thunderbolt Ethernet or Wi-Fi or Display Ethernet) then click Advanced
  • Select the DNS tab
  • Click the + icon to enter the IP Addresses (repeat for each address)
  • Click Apply then click OK

Linux

I will go over doing this in Ubuntu since that is one of the more common flavors.

  • Start System Preferences and click Network Connections
  • Select the connection you want to configure Wired or Wireless tab, then select the appropriate network.
  • Click Edit, and in the window that appears, select the IPv4 Settings or IPv6 Settings tab.
  • If the selected method is Automatic (DHCP), open the dropdown and select Automatic (STATIC) addresses only instead.
  • If the method is set to something else, do not change it.
  • In the DNS servers field, enter the IP addresses, separated by a space:
  • Click Apply
  • If you are prompted for a password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.

If your distribution doesn’t use Network Manager, your DNS settings are specified in /etc/resolv.conf.

Edit resolv.conf:

sudo vi /etc/resolv.conf

If any nameserver lines appear, write down the IP addresses for future reference. Replace or add, the following lines:

nameserver 8.8.8.8
nameserver 8.8.4.4
nameserver 2001:4860:4860::8888
nameserver 2001:4860:4860::8844

Save and exit

:wq

Restart any Internet clients you are using.

sudo /etc/init.d/networking restart

Routers

Every router uses a different user interface for configuring DNS server settings; we provide only a generic procedure below. For more information, please consult your router documentation.

Note:
Some ISPs hard-code their DNS servers into the equipment they provide; if you are using such a device, you will not be able to configure it. Instead, you can configure each of the computers connected to the router, as described above.
  • In your browser, enter the IP address to access the router’s administration console.
  • When prompted, enter the password to access network settings.
  • Find the screen in which DNS server settings are specified.
  • If there are IP addresses specified in the fields for the primary and seconday DNS servers, write them down for future reference.
  • Replace those addresses with the IP addresses from above
  • Save and exit.
  • Restart your browser.

How to assign a static IP address in Windows

Having a home network is awesome, getting your devices to have a static address so you know exactly what devices are connected to your network and to ensure that they keep the same address is even more so. This comes in extra handy if you run a home server to share music or files for example. An extra benefit is that you will no longer get IP conflicts.

In this series (yes, it will be a series as we’ll show you how to do it for Linux and Mac as well), we’ll assume you are already connected and have an IP assigned to the device and that this will be on a wired connection. If you have wireless the process should be the same, just make amends for whatever your wireless connection is on your machine. Continue reading How to assign a static IP address in Windows

Cannot Renew IP Address on WinXP

I know, Windows XP is not supported anymore and should not be used but some people are still using it. If you are one of those people or know someone that does that is getting this error message or something similar relate to IP renewal:

Windows has tried but cannot Renew you IP Address

Here is how to fix it:

Basically we’ll be repairing the TCP/IP Stack

Start Command Prompt

Use one of the following methods:

  1. Hold the Windows key and press R, then type CMD to open a command prompt
  2. Click StartRunCMD to open a command prompt

If those don’t work, run it as admin:

  • StartAll ProgramsAccessories
  • Right click on Command Prompt and select Run as… or Run as administrator

Reset TCP/IP stack to installation defaults.

netsh int ip reset reset.log

Reset WINSOCK entries to installation defaults:

netsh winsock reset catalog

Reboot the machine.