Google Voice and Pixel2 XL

I’ve been using Google Voice for a while now and recently upgraded to the Pixel2 XL on Verizon … No, I won’t do a coverage as there are many out there that are pretty awesome; I will say tho that the issues people are talking about have not plagued my phone at all.

Back to the post, after the switch from my Note5, my Google Voice stopped working with inbound calls and I could not for the life in me figure this out. I was just about to give up when I came across a solution that was way easier than I expected and thought I’d share it here should someone else need it.

Once I had Google Voice setup and connected to my phone (several times 🙂 ), all I had to do was dial *71[Google Voice number] from my phone. example: *710123456789

Some other things you can do :

  • To Activate Busy Transfer, dial *90[Your Google Voice number]
  • To Activate No Answer Transfer, dial *92[Your Google Voice number]
  • To Deactivate the Call Forwarding, dial *73 [Send]
  • To Deactivate the Busy Transfer, dial *900 [Send]
  • To Deactivate the No Answer Transfer, dial *902 [Send]
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Google Chrome – Your Preferences cannot be read

Logged into my Linux computer today and got this error as I tried to start Chrome. Tried the basics and it did not work, searched Google and saw many others having this same issue so I decided to document the process of fixing this issue here. I’ll start with the basic stuff first then will get into the more detailed steps.
Continue reading Google Chrome – Your Preferences cannot be read

Students do what Social Giants drag ass on

While Facebook, Google, Yahoo and other Social Media Giants debate on whether blocking fake news on their services will be bad enough for their bottom line (because they make revenue for clicks on their sites and traffic flow) instead of focusing on the greater good for their users and society on a whole, a group of college Students have stepped up on done their job for them. Continue reading Students do what Social Giants drag ass on

The singularity – Will it Happen?

What is the singularity?

I honestly was not aware of this topic so I set out to do some research to open my mind and man was my mind blown. Basically what I understand is that the singularity is a point in time when technology will surpass human intelligence and humans will start to become the minority in intelligence.

Vernor Vinge introduced the term Technological Singularity in his science fiction novel Marooned in Realtime(1986) and later developed the concept in his essay the Coming Technological Singularity (1993). His definition of Singularity is widely known as the event horizon thesis and in essence says that trans or post-human minds will imply a weirder future than we can imagine:

“Within thirty years, we will have the technological means to create superhuman intelligence. Shortly after, the human era will be ended. […] I think it’s fair to call this event a singularity. It is a point where our models must be discarded and a new reality rules. As we move closer and closer to this point, it will loom vaster and vaster over human affairs till the notion becomes a commonplace. Yet when it finally happens it may still be a great surprise and a greater unknown.” (1)

Continue reading The singularity – Will it Happen?

Google Chrome is not battery friendly

This issue has been recorded as being a Windows issue but I have been seeing this on Mac as well. Will have to check on it and see how to test this on my machine.

There is a serious bug in Chrome that causes the browser to wake up the CPU as many as 1,000 times per second even when idle, thanks to the system clock tick rate being set to 1.00ms by Chrome. This is many times more than the 64 times per second usually observed with the Windows default clock tick rate of 15.625ms. Believe it or not, this bug has been known to Google for many years now and they have just recently decided to deal with it.

As noted on code.google.com:

What steps will reproduce the problem?

1. Just open Google Chrome and navigate to a website with any flash content.
2. System clock tick rate is increased to 1ms
3. Close the website or navigate to page without flash content
4. 1ms tick rate is left forever (until browser is closed)

Seems that Goole Chrome has no system clock tick interval management. Just increases it and keeps forever. Keeping tick rate at 1ms is not recommended. See document:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/hardware/gg463266.aspx

“If the system timer interval is decreased to less than the default, including when an application calls timeBeginPeriod with a resolution of 1 ms, the low-power idle states are ineffective at reducing system power consumption and system battery life suffers. System battery life can be reduced as much as 25 percent, depending on the hardware platform. This is because transitions to and from low-power states incur an energy cost. Therefore, entering and exiting low-power states without spending a minimum amount of time in the low-power states can be more costly than if the system simply remained in the high-power state.”

Currently your options are to star the code tracker here to vote for it’s resolution or use a different browser, we recommend Firefox and check out our fav plugins for it here.

 

Google ramps up Android security, scans all apps now

Google is quick to replace the 2013 “Verify Apps” security feature with mandatory app scan for all apps. The flaw in Verify Apps is that it provides the user the ability to scan third-party apps using Google’s security engine after it has been installed on to the local device. Instead, Google is taking a more proactive approach with its Verify Apps security feature. It will now host a dual-layer security system. First, the Verify Apps will scan apps locally on Android devices to look for malicious activities such as SMS abuse. There will also be a server side scan on Google Play store to scan all apps in the Play Store.

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