Google Chrome – Your Preferences cannot be read

Logged into my Linux computer today and got this error as I tried to start Chrome. Tried the basics and it did not work, searched Google and saw many others having this same issue so I decided to document the process of fixing this issue here. I’ll start with the basic stuff first then will get into the more detailed steps.
Continue reading Google Chrome – Your Preferences cannot be read

Students do what Social Giants drag ass on

While Facebook, Google, Yahoo and other Social Media Giants debate on whether blocking fake news on their services will be bad enough for their bottom line (because they make revenue for clicks on their sites and traffic flow) instead of focusing on the greater good for their users and society on a whole, a group of college Students have stepped up on done their job for them. Continue reading Students do what Social Giants drag ass on

Netflix on Ubuntu 14.04

With many services today needing Silverlight to run web services and many people converting to Linux or refusing to use Windows or Macs it seems like you can’t enjoy those services. Here is a great feature for those of you that use Ubuntu and want to enjoy Netflix on your computer, once you set this up you will have the benefit for other services that require Silverlight.

Tip:
Before installing pipelight, we recommend closing your browsers, copy the information to a text editor so you know what to do or print it out. Not closing out your browser may cause the install to fail

Continue reading Netflix on Ubuntu 14.04

Google Chrome is not battery friendly

This issue has been recorded as being a Windows issue but I have been seeing this on Mac as well. Will have to check on it and see how to test this on my machine.

There is a serious bug in Chrome that causes the browser to wake up the CPU as many as 1,000 times per second even when idle, thanks to the system clock tick rate being set to 1.00ms by Chrome. This is many times more than the 64 times per second usually observed with the Windows default clock tick rate of 15.625ms. Believe it or not, this bug has been known to Google for many years now and they have just recently decided to deal with it.

As noted on code.google.com:

What steps will reproduce the problem?

1. Just open Google Chrome and navigate to a website with any flash content.
2. System clock tick rate is increased to 1ms
3. Close the website or navigate to page without flash content
4. 1ms tick rate is left forever (until browser is closed)

Seems that Goole Chrome has no system clock tick interval management. Just increases it and keeps forever. Keeping tick rate at 1ms is not recommended. See document:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/hardware/gg463266.aspx

“If the system timer interval is decreased to less than the default, including when an application calls timeBeginPeriod with a resolution of 1 ms, the low-power idle states are ineffective at reducing system power consumption and system battery life suffers. System battery life can be reduced as much as 25 percent, depending on the hardware platform. This is because transitions to and from low-power states incur an energy cost. Therefore, entering and exiting low-power states without spending a minimum amount of time in the low-power states can be more costly than if the system simply remained in the high-power state.”

Currently your options are to star the code tracker here to vote for it’s resolution or use a different browser, we recommend Firefox and check out our fav plugins for it here.

 

Chrome Eavesdropping, Balkanized Internet & More…

Is your Chrome browser spying on you?

It’s convoluted and unlikely, perhaps, but there’s a way that websites can trick the Chrome browser into leaving the mic open, allowing who knows whom to eavesdrop.

In Chrome, whenever a website wants to access a visitor’s microphone the browser prompts the user for permission which, if granted, is for that session only. Move to another site or close that tab and the mic is disabled. However, PCWorld reported on Wednesday, there is a way for a site to keep the mic turned on.

“But as Web developer Tal Ater discovered, malicious sites can use pop-under windows to keep listening even after the user has gone to another site or closed the main browser window. Unlike a regular browser tab, pop-under windows don’t show the recording status icon, and can continue to listen in for as long as the pop-under window stays open. The exploit can also stay dormant until the user utters certain key phrases.”

Techworld reported Thursday that although Google had a patch readied to fix this vulnerability on September 24, they decided not to use it.

“‘We’ve reinvestigated and still believe there is no immediate threat, since a user must first enable speech recognition for each site that requests it,’ it [Google] said.”

This kind of makes the case for just using a plug-in mic instead of having one built-in, doesn’t it?

Is the balkanization of the Internet at hand?

It’s no longer news that quite a few countries are concerned enough about the NSA’s actions that they’re taking steps to protect themselves from our spying. This is leading some to suspect this might eventually result in a system of national Internets, as noted by IEEE Spectrum on Thursday.

To a degree, this is already happening. Germany is taking steps to assure that data packets originating in-country to be delivered in-country are never routed outside of Germany. In South America, Brazil’s president Dilma Rousseff is seeking legislation that will force companies, including Facebook and Google, to store all data on servers located within Brazil.

In addition, the NSA’s actions have resulted in a revival of the Open Root Server Network (ORSN), a system of root nameservers operating independently from ICANN. Taken offline in 2008, the system was put back in service in June as a result of Edward Snowden’s whistle-blowing.

Complete Story

How do I clear my web browser’s cache, cookies, and history?

Note: