Google Chrome – Your Preferences cannot be read

Logged into my Linux computer today and got this error as I tried to start Chrome. Tried the basics and it did not work, searched Google and saw many others having this same issue so I decided to document the process of fixing this issue here. I’ll start with the basic stuff first then will get into the more detailed steps.
Continue reading Google Chrome – Your Preferences cannot be read

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Students do what Social Giants drag ass on

While Facebook, Google, Yahoo and other Social Media Giants debate on whether blocking fake news on their services will be bad enough for their bottom line (because they make revenue for clicks on their sites and traffic flow) instead of focusing on the greater good for their users and society on a whole, a group of college Students have stepped up on done their job for them. Continue reading Students do what Social Giants drag ass on

Netflix on Ubuntu 14.04

With many services today needing Silverlight to run web services and many people converting to Linux or refusing to use Windows or Macs it seems like you can’t enjoy those services. Here is a great feature for those of you that use Ubuntu and want to enjoy Netflix on your computer, once you set this up you will have the benefit for other services that require Silverlight.

Tip:
Before installing pipelight, we recommend closing your browsers, copy the information to a text editor so you know what to do or print it out. Not closing out your browser may cause the install to fail

Continue reading Netflix on Ubuntu 14.04

Windows 10: The next chapter WebCast

Windows 10 event is live! Satya Nadella, Chief Executive Officer, and other senior Microsoft executives will be sharing more on the Windows vision, including news of a major, new Windows 10 build. Visit here for instructions on how to view the webcast.

 

we’ll be posting another article later with more details but so far lots of good things to come.

Mozilla’s Electrolysis

The goal of the Electrolysis project (“e10s” for short) is to run web content in a separate process from Firefox itself. The two major advantages of this model are security and performance. Security would improve because the content processes could be sandboxed (although sandboxing the content processes is a separate project from Electrolysis). Performance would improve because the browser UI would not be affected by poor performance of content code (be it layout or JavaScript). Also, content processes could be isolated from each other, which would have similar security and performance benefits.

Although the Gecko platform supports multiple processes, the Firefox frontend is not designed to use them. Work to make the frontend (including addons) support multiple processes was begun in early 2013.

Enabling and Disabling Electrolysis

To enable or disable e10s, open Nightly’s Preferences and check the “Enable E10S” checkbox. You will need to restart Nightly.

Nightly > Preferences > General > Enable E10s

If your browser breaks in a way that you can’t easily recover to change this setting, start Firefox in Safe Mode (by holding Alt/Option during start) which will force-disable e10s and allow you to enter the Preferences dialog and untick the checkbox.

Google Chrome is not battery friendly

This issue has been recorded as being a Windows issue but I have been seeing this on Mac as well. Will have to check on it and see how to test this on my machine.

There is a serious bug in Chrome that causes the browser to wake up the CPU as many as 1,000 times per second even when idle, thanks to the system clock tick rate being set to 1.00ms by Chrome. This is many times more than the 64 times per second usually observed with the Windows default clock tick rate of 15.625ms. Believe it or not, this bug has been known to Google for many years now and they have just recently decided to deal with it.

As noted on code.google.com:

What steps will reproduce the problem?

1. Just open Google Chrome and navigate to a website with any flash content.
2. System clock tick rate is increased to 1ms
3. Close the website or navigate to page without flash content
4. 1ms tick rate is left forever (until browser is closed)

Seems that Goole Chrome has no system clock tick interval management. Just increases it and keeps forever. Keeping tick rate at 1ms is not recommended. See document:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/hardware/gg463266.aspx

“If the system timer interval is decreased to less than the default, including when an application calls timeBeginPeriod with a resolution of 1 ms, the low-power idle states are ineffective at reducing system power consumption and system battery life suffers. System battery life can be reduced as much as 25 percent, depending on the hardware platform. This is because transitions to and from low-power states incur an energy cost. Therefore, entering and exiting low-power states without spending a minimum amount of time in the low-power states can be more costly than if the system simply remained in the high-power state.”

Currently your options are to star the code tracker here to vote for it’s resolution or use a different browser, we recommend Firefox and check out our fav plugins for it here.