Google Chrome – Your Preferences cannot be read

Logged into my Linux computer today and got this error as I tried to start Chrome. Tried the basics and it did not work, searched Google and saw many others having this same issue so I decided to document the process of fixing this issue here. I’ll start with the basic stuff first then will get into the more detailed steps.
Continue reading Google Chrome – Your Preferences cannot be read

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Students do what Social Giants drag ass on

While Facebook, Google, Yahoo and other Social Media Giants debate on whether blocking fake news on their services will be bad enough for their bottom line (because they make revenue for clicks on their sites and traffic flow) instead of focusing on the greater good for their users and society on a whole, a group of college Students have stepped up on done their job for them. Continue reading Students do what Social Giants drag ass on

Netflix on Ubuntu 14.04

With many services today needing Silverlight to run web services and many people converting to Linux or refusing to use Windows or Macs it seems like you can’t enjoy those services. Here is a great feature for those of you that use Ubuntu and want to enjoy Netflix on your computer, once you set this up you will have the benefit for other services that require Silverlight.

Tip:
Before installing pipelight, we recommend closing your browsers, copy the information to a text editor so you know what to do or print it out. Not closing out your browser may cause the install to fail

Continue reading Netflix on Ubuntu 14.04

Windows 10: The next chapter WebCast

Windows 10 event is live! Satya Nadella, Chief Executive Officer, and other senior Microsoft executives will be sharing more on the Windows vision, including news of a major, new Windows 10 build. Visit here for instructions on how to view the webcast.

 

we’ll be posting another article later with more details but so far lots of good things to come.

Mozilla’s Electrolysis

The goal of the Electrolysis project (“e10s” for short) is to run web content in a separate process from Firefox itself. The two major advantages of this model are security and performance. Security would improve because the content processes could be sandboxed (although sandboxing the content processes is a separate project from Electrolysis). Performance would improve because the browser UI would not be affected by poor performance of content code (be it layout or JavaScript). Also, content processes could be isolated from each other, which would have similar security and performance benefits.

Although the Gecko platform supports multiple processes, the Firefox frontend is not designed to use them. Work to make the frontend (including addons) support multiple processes was begun in early 2013.

Enabling and Disabling Electrolysis

To enable or disable e10s, open Nightly’s Preferences and check the “Enable E10S” checkbox. You will need to restart Nightly.

Nightly > Preferences > General > Enable E10s

If your browser breaks in a way that you can’t easily recover to change this setting, start Firefox in Safe Mode (by holding Alt/Option during start) which will force-disable e10s and allow you to enter the Preferences dialog and untick the checkbox.

Google Chrome is not battery friendly

This issue has been recorded as being a Windows issue but I have been seeing this on Mac as well. Will have to check on it and see how to test this on my machine.

There is a serious bug in Chrome that causes the browser to wake up the CPU as many as 1,000 times per second even when idle, thanks to the system clock tick rate being set to 1.00ms by Chrome. This is many times more than the 64 times per second usually observed with the Windows default clock tick rate of 15.625ms. Believe it or not, this bug has been known to Google for many years now and they have just recently decided to deal with it.

As noted on code.google.com:

What steps will reproduce the problem?

1. Just open Google Chrome and navigate to a website with any flash content.
2. System clock tick rate is increased to 1ms
3. Close the website or navigate to page without flash content
4. 1ms tick rate is left forever (until browser is closed)

Seems that Goole Chrome has no system clock tick interval management. Just increases it and keeps forever. Keeping tick rate at 1ms is not recommended. See document:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/hardware/gg463266.aspx

“If the system timer interval is decreased to less than the default, including when an application calls timeBeginPeriod with a resolution of 1 ms, the low-power idle states are ineffective at reducing system power consumption and system battery life suffers. System battery life can be reduced as much as 25 percent, depending on the hardware platform. This is because transitions to and from low-power states incur an energy cost. Therefore, entering and exiting low-power states without spending a minimum amount of time in the low-power states can be more costly than if the system simply remained in the high-power state.”

Currently your options are to star the code tracker here to vote for it’s resolution or use a different browser, we recommend Firefox and check out our fav plugins for it here.

 

DRM in Firefox is The End of Our Digital Security

Mozilla recently decided to add DRM in Firefox even if Mozilla hates it. Almost all video streaming websites use some kind of DRM and as Microsoft, Apple and Google has already implemented DRM in their browsers, Mozilla thinks not adding the DRM in Firefox would make it useless as a product as the user will have to switch to other browser everytime a user visits a website with DRM.

I am not going to either defend Mozilla on the decision of adding DRM in Firefox or write against it, they did what they had to do. In the end its all business, Firefox is of no use to me if I cannot watch Netflix on it. So I can understand the awkward position Mozilla would be in when deciding on the DRM in Firefox, what I don’t understand is How can Mozilla completely ignore the security complications associated with this decision.

In a single line, DRM in Firefox is going to end our digital security as we know it and I’ll explain it how. I don’t care about other browsers as they have already given up on user liberty long ago but Firefox has long stood for our freedom on the web and I respect that, well used to.
For a moment, let’s say we don’t have any problem with the DRM in Firefox and we are actually happy as now we’ll be able to enjoy services like Netflix and others. The problem is that DRM module implemented in Firefox is being developed by Adobe ( Yes, Adobe ), an HTML 5 based DRM implemented in Firefox is being developed by Adobe.

[…]

Mozilla openly admits that there is nothing they can do instead of accepting DRM. Mozilla was one the biggest advocate of Open Source and Free Software on the web. With Mozilla’s recent actions, freedom invading industry practices and continuous enforcements of privacy violating laws, I can image what the future looks like.

Complete Story

Microsoft Releases Security Update For Internet Explorer 0Day Exploit

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Microsoft is releasing a security update for Internet Explorer that closes a gap that allowed attackers to take complete control of a computer. It also issued the update to Windows XP users, despite dropping support for the older operating system last month.

The update will go live at 10 a.m. Pacific time Thursday.

Adrienne Hall, general manager of Microsoft Trustworthy Computing, said in a statement that the company decided to fix the problem quickly for all customers, saying it takes the security of its products “incredibly seriously.”

Microsoft reported the problem Saturday, saying it was aware of “limited, targeted attacks” and that the vulnerability affected Internet Explorer versions 6 through 11

The company said users with automatic updates enabled don’t need to take any action.

Active 0day attack hijacking IE users threatens a quarter of browser market

If you are still using Windows and live your online life using any version of Internet Explorer you will want to keep up with this. My suggestion? Start using an alternate browser like Firefox or Chrome.

No patch available yet for critical bug affecting all supported versions of IE.

Attackers are actively exploiting a previously unknown vulnerability in all supported versions of Internet Explorer that allows them to surreptitiously hijack vulnerable computers, Microsoft warned Sunday.

The zero-day code-execution hole in IE versions 6 through 11 represents a significant threat to the Internet security because there is currently no fix for the underlying bug, which affects an estimated 26 percent of the total browser market. It’s also the first severe vulnerability to target affect Windows XP users since Microsoft withdrew support for that aging OS earlier this month. Users who have the option of using an alternate browser should avoid all use of IE for the time being. Those who remain dependent on the Microsoft browser should immediately install EMET, Microsoft’s freely available toolkit that greatly extends the security of Windows systems. Continue reading Active 0day attack hijacking IE users threatens a quarter of browser market