Completely Uninstall Office 2016 for Mac

Important:

To completely uninstall Office 2016 for Mac you must remove the applications, supporting files, and keychain entries, plus any icons you’ve added to the Dock. Once you’ve removed everything, empty the Trash and restart your Mac to complete the process.

You must be signed in as an administrator or provide an administrator name and password to complete these steps.

There are several things to remove. This article steps you through each one.

Continue reading Completely Uninstall Office 2016 for Mac

Advertisements

macOS 10.13 High Sierra Public Beta

macOS Public Beta is now active, however; there are many articles out there telling users how to signup then leaving them short of getting the actual update.

I have been checking for days now and the update would not show up.. So I dug around and found the installer.
Continue reading macOS 10.13 High Sierra Public Beta

Google Chrome – Your Preferences cannot be read

Logged into my Linux computer today and got this error as I tried to start Chrome. Tried the basics and it did not work, searched Google and saw many others having this same issue so I decided to document the process of fixing this issue here. I’ll start with the basic stuff first then will get into the more detailed steps.
Continue reading Google Chrome – Your Preferences cannot be read

Using Google Public DNS

Most people connect to the internet via their ISP’s DNS servers which more than likely are not the best and more than likely is slowing down your browsing. Using a 3rd party service not only speeds up your experience online. A while ago we wrote about OpenDNS, today we’re going over Google’s DNS service.

Important:
Make sure to write down your ISP’s DNS servers.

Google Public DNS IP addresses

IPv4 addresses are as follows:

  • 8.8.8.8
  • 8.8.4.4

IPv6 addresses are as follows:

  • 2001:4860:4860::8888
  • 2001:4860:4860::8844

Making the changes

Windows

  • Start the Network and Sharing Center (this process varies by windows version)
  • Click Change adadpter settings
  • Right-click Local Area Connection or Wireless Network Connection slelect Properties
  • Type in your administrator password if you are promted for it.
  • Click the Networking tab
  • Under the Internet Protocol Version 4 (TCP/IPv4) or Internet Protocol Version 6 (TCP/IPv6) and click Properties
  • Click Advanced and select the DNS tab, write down any IP’s that are listed here for future reference in case you want to revert later on.
  • Select Use the following DNS server addresses
  • Enter the IP’s from above
  • Restart your computer

Mac OS

  • Click the Apple menu ()
  • Click System Preferences and click the Network logo.
  • Select the connection you want to configure (Thunderbolt Ethernet or Wi-Fi or Display Ethernet) then click Advanced
  • Select the DNS tab
  • Click the + icon to enter the IP Addresses (repeat for each address)
  • Click Apply then click OK

Linux

I will go over doing this in Ubuntu since that is one of the more common flavors.

  • Start System Preferences and click Network Connections
  • Select the connection you want to configure Wired or Wireless tab, then select the appropriate network.
  • Click Edit, and in the window that appears, select the IPv4 Settings or IPv6 Settings tab.
  • If the selected method is Automatic (DHCP), open the dropdown and select Automatic (STATIC) addresses only instead.
  • If the method is set to something else, do not change it.
  • In the DNS servers field, enter the IP addresses, separated by a space:
  • Click Apply
  • If you are prompted for a password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.

If your distribution doesn’t use Network Manager, your DNS settings are specified in /etc/resolv.conf.

Edit resolv.conf:

sudo vi /etc/resolv.conf

If any nameserver lines appear, write down the IP addresses for future reference. Replace or add, the following lines:

nameserver 8.8.8.8
nameserver 8.8.4.4
nameserver 2001:4860:4860::8888
nameserver 2001:4860:4860::8844

Save and exit

:wq

Restart any Internet clients you are using.

sudo /etc/init.d/networking restart

Routers

Every router uses a different user interface for configuring DNS server settings; we provide only a generic procedure below. For more information, please consult your router documentation.

Note:
Some ISPs hard-code their DNS servers into the equipment they provide; if you are using such a device, you will not be able to configure it. Instead, you can configure each of the computers connected to the router, as described above.
  • In your browser, enter the IP address to access the router’s administration console.
  • When prompted, enter the password to access network settings.
  • Find the screen in which DNS server settings are specified.
  • If there are IP addresses specified in the fields for the primary and seconday DNS servers, write them down for future reference.
  • Replace those addresses with the IP addresses from above
  • Save and exit.
  • Restart your browser.

SSH Private-Public Key Auth for Linux and Mac

First Things First

First off, let’s talk about SSH keys and Security real briefly so that you can understand a bit more about what’s going on here and why it’s important. With all the issues happening in today’s digital age, everyone needs to start thinking about and taking one thing very seriously. You know, all the hacking and spying going on around us all.

One of the ways you can accomplish that is by using stronger encryption methods, in this case … SSH Keys or Public Key Cryptography. One of the major things is the key size. 1024 was common but that has long been hacked and not used anymore for websites and other public; so logically many are moving on to 2048 and even 4096, which is what I use.

SSH Keys provide a much more secure way to log into your servers than using passwords. While passwords can be easily broken by brute force attacks, SSH Keys way more difficult and if using a higher key can be almost impossible to decipher.

How does it work?

Generating a key pair provides you with a Private and a Public Key. You place the public key on a server you will connect to leaving the private key on your machine. When you SSH to your server you will not need to enter your password as your public key will be unlocked by your private key and you will be verified and allowed to get in. Continue reading SSH Private-Public Key Auth for Linux and Mac

How to restore your Mac to factory defaults

We’ve all ran into issues with our Macs, Yosemite has issues with upgrading and networking from feedback we’ve gotten from customers and have seen personally; and if you want to roll back to Mavericks, I suggest doing a clean install. Some might even find this handy before selling your existing Mac after getting a new one.

WARNING: Performing the following steps will permanently destroy data on your drive. Make sure you have backed up ALL important data before proceeding.

Here’s how to do it:

If you are getting rid of your machine.

Deauthorize iTunes

  • Open iTunes → click StoreDeauthorize This Computer.
  • Enter your AppleID and password and click Deauthorize.
    • You should also deauthorize any third-party apps, such as Photoshop, that are locked to your Mac.

Turn off File Vault

  • Open System preferences → click on Security & Privacy → open the FileVault tab.
  • Check that it says FileVault is turned off the for the disc [main hard drive].
    • If not click on the padlock icon in the bottom left, enter your password and click on Unlock.
  • Click Turn Off FileVault.

Sign out of iCloud

  • Open System Preferences and click on iCloud and tap on Sign Out Now.
    • To remove all your personal data click on Delete From Mac

Wiping and Rebuilding

Wiping the Drive

  • Boot into recovery mode by holding command + R keys before pressing the power button and holding it until the Utilities window appears.
  • Select Disk Utility → click Continue.
  • Choose your main Volume → click Unmount.
  • Click the Erase tab → click Erase.
  • Click Disk UtilityQuit Disk Utility.

 Re-Install OS X

NOTE: You will need and internet connection to proceed, we suggest using an Ethernet connection for this.
  • Click Reinstall OS X → click Continue.
  • This will start a blank download of the OS X install files.
    • If you are keeping the Mac, proceed with the install by using your AppleID.
    • If you are not keeping it, do not use your Apple ID so that the next owner can finish the install with their AppleID.

Fix for broken search domain resolution in OS X Yosemite

Ok folks, after many moons trying to fix this issue in Yosemite I finally got it… If you are running earlier versions of OSX, see here for the fix.

What am I talking about?

Append search domains for partially qualified domain names when performing DNS lookups. You know.. For example, you work in it and ssh to hosts regularly and your company uses hostname.sub.domain.com or hostname.domain.com but you want to ssh to hostname or hostname.sub to shave some time off your clock. With older versions you could apply a fix with mDNSResponder to work around whatever Apple decided to do there; around rolls Yosemite and they change the whole damn thing around. Continue reading Fix for broken search domain resolution in OS X Yosemite

OS X Yosemite v10.10.1 Update

Apple released their most recent update to their flagship OS that addresses issues many people were having to the point where some, including myself had to revert to Mavericks (sorry, did not do a write-up on that, was super busy with school and work). Basically, I was having drastic wireless connectivity issues that severely hindered my production, both at school and work. Continue reading OS X Yosemite v10.10.1 Update

Flushing your DNS

We all have had that one time when your computer refuses to go to a site, or you can’t connect to something or a network. This is a result of a bad IP address or some other DNS result being cached in your system.

What is DNS caching

At it’s basic, DNS cache is simply how your computer remembers sites or networked locations and devices you’ve visited or networks you’ve connected to. It basically keeps the address that matches the URL of a site you visited for example.

How to flush

Flushing your DNS cache basically clears out all entries from your system and allows new entries to be made so that things flow smoothly. So here is how to do it on different systems.

Windows

Depending on the version of Windows you are using, the process to bring up a Command Prompt will be different but that is what you need. Basically you will want to do the following:

  • For XP – Click Start -> In the Run box type cmd.exe and press Enter
  • For 7 – Click Start -> All Programs -> Accessories -> right click on Command Prompt and click Run as Administrator
  • Win8 and up – Simply type cmd which will bring up the search results to the right of your screen -> right click on Command Prompt and click on Run as Administrator
  • Type ipconfig /flushdns and press Enter

MacOS

  • Open a command terminal and run the following:
    • 10.8 Mountain Lionsudo killall -HUP mDNSResponder then
    • 10.9 Mavericks and up – dscacheutil -flushcache then sudo killall -HUP mDNSResponder

Linux

Open a terminal and run the following sudo dscacheutil -flushcache

Bash ‘Shell Shock’ bug blasts OS X, Linux systems wide open

A bug discovered in the widely used Bash command interpreter poses a critical security risk to Unix and Linux systems – and, thanks to their ubiquity, the internet at large.

It lands countless websites, servers, PCs, OS X Macs, various home routers, and more, in danger of hijacking by hackers.

The vulnerability is present in Bash up to and including version 4.3, and was discovered by Stephane Chazelas. It puts Apache web servers, in particular, at risk of compromise: CGI scripts that use or invoke Bash in any way – including any child processes spawned by the scripts – are vulnerable to remote-code injection. OpenSSH and some DHCP clients are also affected on machines that use Bash.

Ubuntu and other Debian-derived systems that use Dash exclusively are not at risk – Dash isn’t vulnerable, but busted versions of Bash may well be present on the systems anyway. It’s essential you check the shell interpreters you’re using, and any Bash packages you have installed, and patch if necessary.

Security expert Kenn White tweeted:

You can check if you’re vulnerable by running the following lines in your default shell, which on many systems will be Bash. If you see the words “busted”, then you’re at risk. If not, then either your Bash is fixed or your shell is using another interpreter. Continue reading Bash ‘Shell Shock’ bug blasts OS X, Linux systems wide open