Completely Uninstall Office 2016 for Mac

Important:

To completely uninstall Office 2016 for Mac you must remove the applications, supporting files, and keychain entries, plus any icons you’ve added to the Dock. Once you’ve removed everything, empty the Trash and restart your Mac to complete the process.

You must be signed in as an administrator or provide an administrator name and password to complete these steps.

There are several things to remove. This article steps you through each one.

Continue reading Completely Uninstall Office 2016 for Mac

Identify your iPod model

iPod touch (6th generation)

Navigation: Multi-Touch display
Capacity: 16, 32, 64, 128 GB
Model number: A1574

iPod touch (5th generation)

Navigation: Multi-Touch display
Capacity: 16, 32, and 64 GB
Model numbers: A1509, A1421

iPod touch (5th generation 16 GB, Mid 2013)

Navigation: Multi-Touch display
Capacity: 16 GB
Model number: A1509

iPod touch (4th generation)

Navigation: Multi-Touch display
Capacity: 8, 16, 32, and 64 GB
Model numbers: A1367

iPod touch (3rd generation)

Navigation: Multi-Touch display
Capacity: 32 and 64 GB
Model number: A1318

iPod touch (2nd generation)

Navigation: Multi-Touch display
Capacity: 8, 16, and 32 GB
Model numbers: A1288, A1319 for China only

iPod touch

Navigation: Multi-Touch display
Capacity: 8, 16, and 32 GB
Model numbers: A1213

iPod nano (7th generation Mid 2015)

Navigation: Multi-Touch display
Capacity: 16 GB
Model number: A1446

iPod nano (7th generation)

Navigation: Multi-Touch display
Capacity: 16 GB
Model number: A1446

iPod nano (6th generation)

Navigation: Multi-Touch display
Capacity: 8 and 16 GB
Model number: A1366

iPod nano (5th generation)

Navigation: Click Wheel
Capacity: 8 and 16 GB
Model number: A1320

iPod nano (4th generation)

Navigation: Click Wheel
Capacity: 8 and 16 GB
Model number: A1285

iPod nano (3rd generation)

Navigation: Click Wheel
Capacity: 4 and 8 GB
Model number: A1236

iPod nano (2nd generation)

Navigation: Click Wheel
Capacity: 2, 4, and 8 GB
Model number: A1199

iPod nano

Navigation: Click Wheel
Capacity: 1, 2, and 4 GB
Model numbers: A1137

iPod shuffle (4th generation Mid 2015)

Navigation: Control Pad
Capacity: 2 GB
Model number: A1373

iPod shuffle (4th generation Late 2012)

Navigation: Control Pad
Capacity: 2 GB
Model number: A1373

iPod shuffle (4th generation)

Navigation: Control Pad
Capacity: 2 GB
Model number: A1373

iPod shuffle (3rd generation Late 2009)

Navigation: Apple Earphones with Remote
Capacity: 2 and 4 GB
Model number: A1271

iPod shuffle (3rd generation)

Navigation: Apple Earphones with Remote
Capacity: 4 GB
Model number: A1271

iPod shuffle (2nd generation)

Navigation: Control Pad
Capacity: 1 and 2 GB
Model numbers: A1204

iPod shuffle

Navigation: Control Pad
Capacity: 512 MB and 1 GB
Model number: A1112

iPod mini (2nd generation)

Navigation: Click Wheel
Capacity: 4 and 6 GB
Model number: A1051

iPod mini

Navigation: Click Wheel
Capacity: 4 GB
Model number: A1051

iPod classic 160 GB (Late 2009)

Navigation: Click Wheel
Capacity: 160 GB
Model number: A1238

iPod classic (120 GB)

Navigation: Click Wheel
Capacity: 120 GB
Model number: A1238

iPod classic

Navigation: Click Wheel
Capacity: 80 and 160 GB
Model number: A1238

iPod (5th generation Late 2006) – also known as iPod with video or Fifth Generation iPod

Navigation: Click Wheel
Capacity: 30 and 80 GB
Model number: A1238

iPod (5th generation) – also known as iPod with video or Fifth Generation iPod

Navigation: Click Wheel
Capacity: 30 and 60 GB
Model number: A1238

iPod Special Edition U2

Navigation: Click Wheel
Capacity: 20 and 30 GB
Model numbers: A1136, A1099, A1059

iPod with color display

Navigation: Click Wheel
Capacity: 20 and 60 GB
Model number: A1099

iPod photo (also known as iPod with color display)

Navigation: Click Wheel
Capacity: 30, 40, and 60 GB
Model numbers: A1099

iPod (Click Wheel)

Navigation: Click Wheel
Capacity: 20 and 40 GB
Model number: A1059

iPod (Dock Connector)

Navigation: Touch Wheel
Capacity: 10, 15, 20, 30, and 40 GB
Model numbers: A1040

iPod (Touch Wheel)

Navigation: Touch Wheel
Capacity: 10 and 20 GB
Model number: A1019

iPod (Scroll Wheel)

Navigation: Scroll Wheel
Capacity: 5 and 10 GB
Model numbers: M8541

How to Identify Your iPhone Model

iPhone 7

Year introduced: 2016
Capacity: 32, 128, 256 GB
Colors: Black, jet black, gold, rose gold, silver, (PRODUCT)RED
Model number on the back cover: A1660, A1778, A1779 (Japan*)

iPhone 7 Plus

Year introduced: 2016
Capacity: 32, 128, 256 GB
Colors: Black, jet black, gold, rose gold, silver, (PRODUCT)RED
Model number on the back cover: A1661, A1784, A1785 (Japan*)

iPhone 6s

Year introduced: 2015
Capacity: 16, 32, 64, 128 GB
Colors: Space gray, silver, gold, rose gold
Model number on the back cover: A1633, A1688, A1700

iPhone 6s Plus

Year introduced: 2015
Capacity: 16, 32, 64, 128 GB
Colors: Space gray, silver, gold, rose gold
Model number on the back cover: A1634, A1687, A1699

iPhone 6

Year introduced: 2014
Capacity: 16, 32, 64, 128 GB
Colors: Space gray, silver, gold
Model number on the back cover: A1549, A1586, A1589

iPhone 6 Plus

Year introduced: 2014
Capacity: 16, 64, 128 GB
Colors: Space gray, silver, gold
Model number on the back cover: A1522, A1524, A1593

iPhone SE

Year introduced: 2016
Capacity: 16, 32, 64, 128 GB
Colors: Space gray, silver, gold, rose gold
Model number on the back cover: A1723, A1662, A1724

iPhone 5s

Year introduced: 2013
Capacity: 16, 32, 64 GB
Colors: Space gray, silver, gold
Model number on the back cover: A1453, A1457, A1518, A1528,
A1530, A1533

iPhone 5c

Year introduced: 2013
Capacity: 8, 16, 32 GB
Colors: White, blue, pink, green, yellow
Model number on the back cover: A1456, A1507, A1516, A1529, A1532

iPhone 5

Year introduced: 2012
Capacity: 16, 32, 64 GB
Colors: Black and white
Model number on the back cover: A1428, A1429, A1442

iPhone 4s

Year introduced: 2011
Capacity: 8, 16, 32, 64 GB
Colors: Black and white
Model number on the back cover: A1431, A1387

iPhone 4

Year introduced: 2010 (GSM), 2011 (CDMA)
Capacity: 8, 16, 32 GB
Colors: Black and white
Model number on the back cover: A1349, A1332

iPhone 3GS

Year introduced: 2009
Capacity: 8, 16, 32 GB
Colors: Black and white
Model number on the back cover: A1325, A1303

iPhone 3G

Year introduced: 2008, 2009 (China)
Capacity: 8, 16 GB
Model number on the back cover: A1324, A1241

iPhone

Year introduced: 2007
Capacity: 4, 8, 16 GB
The model number on the back case is A1203.

macOS 10.13 High Sierra Public Beta

macOS Public Beta is now active, however; there are many articles out there telling users how to signup then leaving them short of getting the actual update.

I have been checking for days now and the update would not show up.. So I dug around and found the installer.
Continue reading macOS 10.13 High Sierra Public Beta

Minecraft Is Getting Cross-Play On Multiple Platforms

With the upcoming release of the Better Together this summer, Mojang will unify the Nintendo Switch and Xbox One with mobile and Windows 10 PC versions of the game under the Bedrock Engine family. (excluding Java Minecraft which will continue to be supported as an independent version)
Continue reading Minecraft Is Getting Cross-Play On Multiple Platforms

Can I run iOS 11?

iOS 11 is compatible with these devices.

iPhone

  • iPhone 7
  • iPhone 7 Plus
  • iPhone 6s
  • iPhone 6s Plus
  • iPhone 6
  • iPhone 6 Plus
  • iPhone SE
  • iPhone 5s

iPad

  • 12.9-inch iPad Pro 2nd generation
  • 12.9-inch iPad Pro 1st generation
  • 10.5-inch iPad Pro
  • 9.7-inch iPad Pro
  • iPad Air 2
  • iPad Air
  • iPad 5th generation
  • iPad mini 4
  • iPad mini 3
  • iPad mini 2

iPod

  • iPod touch 6th generation

New iOS 11 Features

  • Files across services like iCloud Drive, Dropbox and Box
  • New Smart Dock
  • Multitasking via  Split Over or Split View
  • Drag and Drop
  • Apple Pencil for Screen Markup, Notes and Drawing
  • Document Scanning from Notes, sign with your Apple Pencil
  • ARKit – Augmented Reality
  • Redesigned App Store
  • Customizeable Control Center
  • Privacy at the forefront

Google Chrome – Your Preferences cannot be read

Logged into my Linux computer today and got this error as I tried to start Chrome. Tried the basics and it did not work, searched Google and saw many others having this same issue so I decided to document the process of fixing this issue here. I’ll start with the basic stuff first then will get into the more detailed steps.
Continue reading Google Chrome – Your Preferences cannot be read

iOS 9 is out in the wild

Apple released iOS 9 into the wild and it looks awesome. I don’t run an iDevice so I can’t comment on it as far as performance and overall satisfaction but I will be checking in with friends that do to get their feedback.

If you use an iDevice and want to know if you can install iOS 9, here is the list of compatible devices:

iPhone iPad iPod
  • iPhone 6s
  • iPhone 6s Plus
  • iPhone 6
  • iPhone 6 Plus
  • iPhone 5s
  • iPhone 5c
  • iPhone 5
  • iPhone 4s
  • iPad Pro
  • iPad Air 2
  • iPad Air
  • iPad 4th generation
  • iPad 3rd generation
  • iPad 2
  • iPad mini 4
  • iPad mini 3
  • iPad mini 2
  • iPad mini
  • iPod touch 6th generation
  • iPod touch 5th generation

Noteworthy features

Notes

  • The Notes app has always been great for jotting down your thoughts. And now it’s great for so much more.
  • Turn lists into checklists – Add bullets with a tap to create checklists. Make a grocery list, a wish list, or a to-do list — and check off items as you go.
  • Sketch your thoughts – Use the tip of your finger to draw right in your note. A selection of drawing tools lets you choose different brush styles and colors. And a handy ruler helps you keep things straight.
  • Note it with a photo – Now you can take a photo from within the Notes app. Or tap to access your photo library and add an existing photo or video to a note.
  • All your notes across all your devices – Notes works with iCloud so you can access your notes no matter which device you’re using.

Maps

  • Transit – Maps now features Transit view, bringing you public transit information with routes and directions.
  • Nearby – When you search in Maps, you’ll see a list of categories including Food, Drinks, Shopping, Fun, and more.

Multitasking

  • Slide Over – Now you can open a second app without leaving the one you’re in.
  • Split View – With Split View, you can go a step further and have two apps open and active at the same time.
  • Picture in Picture – While using FaceTime or watching a video, press the Home button and your video screen scales down to a corner of your display.

Even longer battery life.

Across the entire operating system, apps and key technologies have been made more efficient to trim battery usage wherever possible — so you get more battery life for the things you do every day.

Smaller, more convenient updates.

iOS 9 does even more to efficiently stream new updates to your device without having to first download and unpack them — which means you don’t need as much free space to update.

  • iOS 9 – 1.3GB
  • iOS 8 – 4.58GB

Faster and more responsive.

The apps in iOS 9 now take advantage of Metal, making more efficient use of the CPU and GPU to deliver faster scrolling, smoother animation, and better overall performance.

Improved security.

Keeping your devices and Apple ID secure is essential to protecting your personal information — like photos, documents, messages, email, and so much more.

Six-digit passcodes

The default for passcodes on your Touch ID–enabled iPhone and iPad is now six digits instead of four.

Two-factor authentication

A password alone is not always enough to keep your account secure. That’s why iOS 9 and OS X El Capitan have built-in support for two-factor authentication.

Using Google Public DNS

Most people connect to the internet via their ISP’s DNS servers which more than likely are not the best and more than likely is slowing down your browsing. Using a 3rd party service not only speeds up your experience online. A while ago we wrote about OpenDNS, today we’re going over Google’s DNS service.

Important:
Make sure to write down your ISP’s DNS servers.

Google Public DNS IP addresses

IPv4 addresses are as follows:

  • 8.8.8.8
  • 8.8.4.4

IPv6 addresses are as follows:

  • 2001:4860:4860::8888
  • 2001:4860:4860::8844

Making the changes

Windows

  • Start the Network and Sharing Center (this process varies by windows version)
  • Click Change adadpter settings
  • Right-click Local Area Connection or Wireless Network Connection slelect Properties
  • Type in your administrator password if you are promted for it.
  • Click the Networking tab
  • Under the Internet Protocol Version 4 (TCP/IPv4) or Internet Protocol Version 6 (TCP/IPv6) and click Properties
  • Click Advanced and select the DNS tab, write down any IP’s that are listed here for future reference in case you want to revert later on.
  • Select Use the following DNS server addresses
  • Enter the IP’s from above
  • Restart your computer

Mac OS

  • Click the Apple menu ()
  • Click System Preferences and click the Network logo.
  • Select the connection you want to configure (Thunderbolt Ethernet or Wi-Fi or Display Ethernet) then click Advanced
  • Select the DNS tab
  • Click the + icon to enter the IP Addresses (repeat for each address)
  • Click Apply then click OK

Linux

I will go over doing this in Ubuntu since that is one of the more common flavors.

  • Start System Preferences and click Network Connections
  • Select the connection you want to configure Wired or Wireless tab, then select the appropriate network.
  • Click Edit, and in the window that appears, select the IPv4 Settings or IPv6 Settings tab.
  • If the selected method is Automatic (DHCP), open the dropdown and select Automatic (STATIC) addresses only instead.
  • If the method is set to something else, do not change it.
  • In the DNS servers field, enter the IP addresses, separated by a space:
  • Click Apply
  • If you are prompted for a password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.

If your distribution doesn’t use Network Manager, your DNS settings are specified in /etc/resolv.conf.

Edit resolv.conf:

sudo vi /etc/resolv.conf

If any nameserver lines appear, write down the IP addresses for future reference. Replace or add, the following lines:

nameserver 8.8.8.8
nameserver 8.8.4.4
nameserver 2001:4860:4860::8888
nameserver 2001:4860:4860::8844

Save and exit

:wq

Restart any Internet clients you are using.

sudo /etc/init.d/networking restart

Routers

Every router uses a different user interface for configuring DNS server settings; we provide only a generic procedure below. For more information, please consult your router documentation.

Note:
Some ISPs hard-code their DNS servers into the equipment they provide; if you are using such a device, you will not be able to configure it. Instead, you can configure each of the computers connected to the router, as described above.
  • In your browser, enter the IP address to access the router’s administration console.
  • When prompted, enter the password to access network settings.
  • Find the screen in which DNS server settings are specified.
  • If there are IP addresses specified in the fields for the primary and seconday DNS servers, write them down for future reference.
  • Replace those addresses with the IP addresses from above
  • Save and exit.
  • Restart your browser.

SSH Private-Public Key Auth for Linux and Mac

First Things First

First off, let’s talk about SSH keys and Security real briefly so that you can understand a bit more about what’s going on here and why it’s important. With all the issues happening in today’s digital age, everyone needs to start thinking about and taking one thing very seriously. You know, all the hacking and spying going on around us all.

One of the ways you can accomplish that is by using stronger encryption methods, in this case … SSH Keys or Public Key Cryptography. One of the major things is the key size. 1024 was common but that has long been hacked and not used anymore for websites and other public; so logically many are moving on to 2048 and even 4096, which is what I use.

SSH Keys provide a much more secure way to log into your servers than using passwords. While passwords can be easily broken by brute force attacks, SSH Keys way more difficult and if using a higher key can be almost impossible to decipher.

How does it work?

Generating a key pair provides you with a Private and a Public Key. You place the public key on a server you will connect to leaving the private key on your machine. When you SSH to your server you will not need to enter your password as your public key will be unlocked by your private key and you will be verified and allowed to get in. Continue reading SSH Private-Public Key Auth for Linux and Mac