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Researchers find over 100 spying Tor nodes

Researchers find over 100 spying Tor nodes that attempt to compromise darknet sites

When it comes to accessing public websites, Tor has an intrinsic security problem: though the nodes between your computer and the public internet are unable to see where the traffic is coming from or going to, the final hop in the network (known as an exit node) gets to know what webserver you are connecting to.

If that final hop isn’t protected by an HTTPS connection — if it takes place without encryption — then all the traffic between you and the webserver are an open book to the exit node. It can see what you send and what you receive, and it can tamper with the connection (for example, it can inject malicious code that exploits bugs in your browser to take it over). If your session includes identifying information — your Google cookie, say, or a login and password — then someone running a spying exit node can figure out who you are without having to poison your session. This was much more of a problem when HTTPS connections were more rare, but now, thanks to the Snowden revelations and projects like Let’s Encrypt, much of the web is encrypted by default. That means that a spying exit node will only be able to see which server is being accessed, but not which page, and will not be able to inject code into the session, and will not be able to see the data going to and from the server.

The lack of exit nodes means that if you run an exit node and want to spy on people, you can see an appreciable fraction of all the Tor traffic that goes to and from the public internet. Many governments, including the Chinese government, are understood to be running high-availability exit nodes that snoop on and log all the traffic they can see.

The researchers used “honeypot” .onion servers to find the spying computers: these honeypots were .onion sites that the researchers set up in their own lab and then connected to repeatedly over the Tor network, thus seeding many Tor nodes with the information of the honions’ existence. They didn’t advertise the honions’ existence in any other way and there was nothing of interest at these sites, and so when the sites logged new connections, the researchers could infer that they were being contacted by a system that had spied on one of their Tor network circuits.

No one knows who is running the spying nodes: they could be run by criminals, governments, private suppliers of “infowar” weapons to governments, independent researchers, or other scholars (though scholarly research would not normally include attempts to hack the servers once they were discovered).

“We create what we call ‘honey onions’ or ‘honions.’ These are onion addresses that we don’t share with anyone,” Noubir said. If someone visits the sites, it’s a good indication that their service has been picked up by a malicious HSDir.

At any one time, the pair ran 4,500 honey onions over 72 days, and found at least 110 HSDirs spying on hidden services. Some of the actors behind these weren’t just passive observers; many came back and then aggressively probed the hidden services.

“They’re looking for vulnerabilities in the web server,” Sanatinia said. Those attackers might look for cross-site scripting attacks, SQL-injection vulnerabilities, or just try to find the server’s status page, which can reveal lots of interesting, and potentially identifying, information about the site.

Most of the dodgy HSDirs the researchers found were hosted in the US, followed by Germany, France, and then other European countries. Of course, that doesn’t necessarily mean their operators are based in the same country; anyone can whip up a remote server from pretty much anywhere in the world. And because over half of the 110 nodes were hosted on cloud infrastructure, it’s not easy to immediately pin down who’s behind them.

View entire article on BoinBoing

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