How to assign a static IP address in Windows

Having a home network is awesome, getting your devices to have a static address so you know exactly what devices are connected to your network and to ensure that they keep the same address is even more so. This comes in extra handy if you run a home server to share music or files for example. An extra benefit is that you will no longer get IP conflicts.

In this series (yes, it will be a series as we’ll show you how to do it for Linux and Mac as well), we’ll assume you are already connected and have an IP assigned to the device and that this will be on a wired connection. If you have wireless the process should be the same, just make amends for whatever your wireless connection is on your machine.

Getting the current IP

Windows 8 and up

Click on the windows key to bring up the Search bar
Type cmd and press enter

Windows 7

Click Start button

In the search field type cmd and press Enter

In the pop-up window run the following command:

ipconfig / all

Which will result in something like this:

Windows IP Configuration
    Host Name . . . . . . . . . . . . : pc-name
    Primary Dns Suffix  . . . . . . . : domain.xxx
    Node Type . . . . . . . . . . . . : Hybrid
    IP Routing Enabled. . . . . . . . : No
    WINS Proxy Enabled. . . . . . . . : No
    DNS Suffix Search List. . . . . . : domain.xxx

Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection:
    Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . : domain.xxx
    Description . . . . . . . . . . . : network card info
    Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-00-00-00-00-00
    DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes
    Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes
    Link-local IPv6 Address . . . . . : xxxx::xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx(Preferred)
    IPv4 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.10
    Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
    Lease Obtained. . . . . . . . . . : day, date, time
    Lease Expires . . . . . . . . . . : day, date, time
    Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.1
    DHCP Server . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.1

    DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : 8.8.8.8
                        8.8.4.4
                        2001:4860:4860:8888
                        2001:4860:4860:8844
    NetBIOS over Tcpip. . . . . . . . : Enabled

Setting up your IP

Once we have the above information we need to edit our network settings and apply the static IP info. You will need to write the following bits down:

  • IPv4 Address
  • Subnet Mask
  • Default Gateway
  • DNS Servers

Windows 7

  • Click StartControl Panel.
  • Click Network and Internet, then Network and Sharing Center, and click Change adapter settings.
  • Select the connection for which you want to configure. For example:
    • To change the settings for an Ethernet connection, right-click Local Area Connection and click Properties.
    • To change the settings for a wireless connection, right-click Wireless Network Connection and click Properties.
  • If you are prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.
  • Under This connection uses the following items, select Internet Protocol Version 4 (TCP/IPv4) then click Properties.

Windows 8 and up

  • Click on the windows key to bring up the Search bar
  • Type Control Panel and press enter
  • Click on View Network Status and Tasks.
  • Single click Change adapter settings on the left side of your screen.
  • Right click on the adapter you want to edit, (generally it will be Wi-Fi or Ethernet) and select Properties
  • Click Internet Protocol Version 4(TCP/IPv4) and then the Properties button.

Entering the data

IPv4 Window

  • Select Use the following IP address and fill in with the info we got earlier.
  • Select Use the following DNS server address and fill in with the info we got earlier.

Click OKClose

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